Category Archives: Design

Relationship-Driven – Customer-centric Principle Four

4. Relationship-Driven – “With Me, Along the Way: I have an ongoing relationship with the company; there is a clear focus on relationship-building versus transaction-processing, they manage for the long term value in our relationship.” HyFlex courses implement this principle … Continue reading

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Delight the Customer – Customer-centric Principle Three

3. Delight the Customer – “Anticipates My Needs: My interactions with the company are excellent; they are solution-focused versus product-centric.” HyFlex courses implement this principle when the focus of faculty and student effort is on achieving important learning outcomes, not … Continue reading

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Personalize – Customer-centric Principle One

1. Personalize – “Addresses My Unique Needs: Products and interactions with the company are tailored for me and my situation.” HyFlex courses may be designed to meet the unique (and personal) needs of learners, especially as they relate to completing … Continue reading

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Shifting Expectations

Akin to the changing messages to various adoption groups (see previous posts in the HyFlex World), the expected returns (expectations) may change over time as faculty, students and administers develop some experience using HyFlex courses. This is a natural process, … Continue reading

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Effective Practices: Overlapping Discussions

One method of combining f2f and online students that I have found effective is to overlap the two sets of students in a topical discussion. Often, I will use small discussion groups in class to focus on various aspects of … Continue reading

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Good Enough?

In the early days of HyFlex, “good enough” was good enough. It seems the bar has been raised with my own students and even in my own expectations, which is, I believe, a good and natural thing. What used to … Continue reading

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Student Responsibility for Learning

Who is responsible for student learning? Teacher? University or School? Student? Parent? Sponsors? We all know it depends greatly on the situation, and that responsibility for learning is shared among all the stakeholders. In graduate education, those stakeholders are primarily … Continue reading

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What Happens When the University Cannot Host Classes?

Well, if you have a HyFlex class, you can simply require all your students to meet online for that session. This works well if they all have network access, the tools and ability to participate in the online mode, and … Continue reading

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The Student Assistant Voice: Supporting Instructors in Using Hyflex

I asked a recent graduate to talk about her experience working with one of our faculty in creating a HyFlex version of his traditional classroom-delivered course. Here is what she said. If you want to learn more about Hyflex or get hands-on experience organizing a course in an LMS, a nice way to get started is to work with a professor who has used this approach before. I did this during the Fall 2010 semester, and learned a lot … Continue reading

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Discussions drive connections among students

In a HyFlex course, the online discussions are a primary means of connecting students who complete class activities online and offline (in-person, in class).  Though a natural connection point is course content, in general, content itself is not interactive. Students … Continue reading

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